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Tracy Underwood

DPhil student 2009 - 2013

Tracy graduated with a Bachelors in Physics from the University of Oxford and an MSc in Medical Engineering and Physics from King's College London. She then joined the CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology to pursue an MRC-funded DPhil project on the dosimetry of small photon beams, supervised by Dr Mark Hill, Dr Helen Winter and Dr John Fenwick. To date, the key paper from Tracy's DPhil research, published in Physics in Medicine and Biology, has been downloaded over 12,000 times. Tracy's work also prompted the leading commercial dosimeter manufacturer, PTW, to prototype a new water-equivalent detector for small photon beams: the 'DiodeAir'.

After submitting her DPhil thesis, Tracy received an MRC Centenary Early ‘transition to postdoc’ Career Award and was the 2015 winner of the IET/IMechE prize for the Best Medical Engineering PhD.

Tracy pursued postdoctoral research on small field dosimetry in Toulouse with a personal award from the Leverhulme Trust then went on to win a prestigious EC Marie Curie Research Fellowship with a joint appointment at Harvard Medical School and University College London (UCL). Tracy has given presentations at ASTRO and ESTRO, chaired a session, and has been invited to present at national meetings. She lectures on undergraduate and MSc courses on medical physics at both UCL and King's College London and is a keen mentor of students and director of a summer school aimed at 16-18 year olds interested in a career in engineering/physical sciences.

In 2017 Tracy received an Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine Academic Early Career Award.

College: 
Lincoln College

Associated Researchers

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