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Oxford researcher secures funding for powerful imaging technique in pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund (PCRF) is funding six new research projects with a total of £1 million - bringing the charity’s support for research into the UK’s most lethal cancer to over £8 million. This is the third year that PCRF has invested £1 million in a single funding round. In total, the charity has funded 40 cutting edge research projects across the UK and Ireland, worth over £6 million.

Department of Oncology researcher Dr Bart Cornelissen will be leading one of the six newly funded projects. Dr Cornelissen aims to use powerful imaging techniques to diagnose early stage pancreatic cancer. His team has already developed an imaging agent that attaches to a protein known as claudin-4 which is expressed in the early stages of the disease. This project will develop the agent so that this protein can be rapidly detected and monitored using PET scanners, which are increasingly common in hospitals.  Dr Cornelissen is part of the Cancer Research UK Oxford Centre Pancreatic Cancer working group, and the early stages of this project were supported by an Oxford Centre Development Fund award.

Projects at Imperial College London, University of Liverpool, Swansea University, Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute and Queen Mary University of London, will also receive funding.

These new grants are in addition to the £2 million committed to the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund Tissue Bank, which launched in January 2016 and will accelerate research progress. The Tissue Bank is the world’s first nationally co-ordinated pancreas tissue bank and has already been hailed as “one of the most important developments in resourcing UK pancreatic cancer research in a generation” (1)

Says PCRF’s founder and CEO, Maggie Blanks: “In the charity’s early years, we had to focus on basic research to help understand pancreatic cancer and its mechanisms, with the knowledge that this would be a springboard for future research progress. More recently – typified by this year’s grants – we’ve been able to focus on projects that are closer to patients. These include innovative ways of making current treatments much more effective, developing ‘personalised medicine’ approaches and finding ways to diagnose the disease in its earliest stages. 

We’re committed to beating this disease and thanks to our loyal supporters whose fundraising enables us to fund all these projects and initiatives, we’re making real progress towards this goal.” 

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