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Background The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) is often delayed. This first UK population-based epidemiological study of NENs compares outcomes with non-NENs to identify any inequalities. Methods Age-standardised incidence rate (ASR), 1-year overall survival, hazard ratios, and standardised mortality rates (SMRs) were calculated for all malignant NENs diagnosed 2013–2015 from UK national Public Health records. Comparison with non-NENs assessed 1-year overall survival (1YS) and association between diagnosis at stage IV and morphology. Results A total of 15 222 NENs were identified, with an ASR (2013–2015 combined) of 8·6 per 100 000 (95% CI 8·5–8·7); 4·6 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4·5–4·7) for gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) NENs. The 1YS was 75% (95% CI, 73·9–75.4) varying significantly by sex. Site and morphology were prognostic. NENs (predominantly small cell carcinomas) in the oesophagus, bladder, prostate, and female reproductive organs had a poorer outcome and were three times more likely to be diagnosed at stage IV than non-NENs. Conclusion Advanced stage at diagnosis with significantly poorer outcomes of some NENs compared with non-NENs at the same anatomical site, highlight the need for improved access to specialist services and targeted service improvement

Type

Journal article

Journal

British Journal of Cancer

Publisher

Springer Nature [academic journals on nature.com]

Publication Date

04/10/2019

Addresses

Tracey Genus, Neuroendocrine Tumour Patients Foundation, Leamington Spa, United Kingdom, Catherine Bouvier, Neuroendocrine Tumour Patients Foundation, Leamington Spa, United Kingdom, Kwok F Wong, Public Health England, Birmingham, United Kingdom, Rajaventhan Srirajaskanthan, King's College Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, London, United Kingdom, Brian A. Rous, Public Health England, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Denis C. Talbot, University of Oxford, Department of Oncology, Cancer & Haematology Centre, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX3 7LE, United Kingdom, Juan W Valle, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Oncology, Manchester, United Kingdom, Mohid Khan, University Hospital of Wales, Department of Gastroenterology, Cardiff, United Kingdom, Neil Pearce, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Southampton, United Kingdom, Mona Elshafie, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Cellular Pathology, Birmingham, United Kingdom, Nicholas S. Reed, Gartnavel General Hospital, Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom, Eileen Morgan, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland Cancer Registry, Centre for Public Health, Belfast, United Kingdom, Andrew Deas, National Health Service Scotland, Information Services Division,, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, Ceri White, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Welsh Cancer Intelligence & Surveillance Unit, Cardiff, United Kingdom, Dyfed Huws, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Welsh Cancer Intelligence & Surveillance Unit, Cardiff, United Kingdom, John Ramage, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Gastroenterology, London, United Kingdom

Keywords

Neuroendocrine cancer, epidemiology, incidence, survival, mortality