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The Department of Oncology has signed up to collaborate with Crescendo Biologics Ltd (Crescendo), the drug developer of novel, targeted T cell enhancing therapeutics.

This collaboration will accelerate the development of CB307, Crescendo’s lead programme for PSMA positive tumours, and its follow on pipeline of CD137-directed T cell enhancing programmes.


The Department’s Human Tissue Facility, led by Dr Kerry Fisher, focuses on deepening our understanding of the tumour microenvironment to develop innovative new therapies for cancer patients.


Dr Kerry Fisher, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, commented:

“We look forward to working with Crescendo to further explore and understand the mechanisms driving the development of cancers and applying our group’s translational expertise to advance Crescendo’s novel Humabody® programmes.”

 

Full details on the Crescendo Biologics news page

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