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The NIHR has invested £34 million of funding into global health research projects to tackle epilepsy, infection-related cancers and severe stigmatising skin diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

The NIHR Research and Innovation for Global Health Transformation (RIGHT) programme has awarded Official Development Assistance (ODA) funding to eight projects led by teams made up of researchers in the UK and those in LMICs.

Professor Anna Schuh from the Department of Oncology is leading one of the eight projects, and will be investigating two new techniques to diagnose Epstein-Barr virus, a common cause of blood cancers in sub-Saharan Africa. Her research in Tanzania and Uganda aims to speed up diagnosis and treatment of the infection, reducing the mortality rate from these cancers.

 

For more information on the full recipients of funding for this programme grant, please go to https://www.nihr.ac.uk/news/nihr-invests-34-million-into-global-health-research-on-epilepsy-infection-related-cancers-and-severe-stigmatising-skin-diseases/22764

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