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Professor Nicola Sibson has been involved in the CNIO platform to compile a repository for brain metastasis cell lines.

Cancer cells (in green) invading a mouse brain (blood vessels in red). /CNIO
  • The Brain Metastasis Cell Lines Panel (BrMPanel) is the first to compile information on more than 60 cell lines related to brain metastasis research
  • The platform was spearheaded by CNIO researcher Manuel Valiente, who coordinated its 19 constituent international laboratories and seeks to turn it into a ‘white paper’ for research in this area
  • The goal is to streamline brain metastasis research for the development of therapies and to encourage new scientific teams to participate in studying this area, which constitutes one of the main challenges of cancer research

Science is collaborative by nature, since scientific knowledge only advances, step by step, through combined efforts and findings. Nevertheless, there is often a lack of communication regarding the more technical and everyday advances in laboratory work, and as a result research progresses less quickly. In recent years, largely thanks to the development of the digital ecosystem, these communication barriers are being overcome, which results in improved transparency and knowledge exchange between scientific teams.

In line with this trend, for the first time, a group of 19 international laboratories has agreed to digitally pool and organise their information on brain metastasis, with the aim of facilitating their research and speeding up obtaining results and effective therapies. This effort was coordinated by the Brain Metastasis Group, led by Manuel Valiente at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), and the information has been integrated into the website of the CNIO Brain Metastasis Cell Lines Panel (BrMPanel). The paper is published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

 

The full news article is available on the CNIO website 

 

For further information and interviews, please contact:

Departament of Communications

Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO)

+34 91 732 8000

comunicacion@cnio.es

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