Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Eileen is awarded funding for her research into the tumour microenvironment

A picture of Eileen Parkes next to the Wellcome Trust logo

Dr Eileen Parkes has received a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Career Development Fellowship. This prestigious and highly competitive award will support Eileen and her team with their research into the tumour microenvironment of highly chromosomally unstable oesophageal adenocarcinomas. These aggressive cancers have constitutive cGAS activation, and Eileen, her team and collaborators will model this using novel cell lines and organoids (including fibroblast and immune-cell co-cultures) to understand how this signalling axis impacts the formation of extracellular matrix and subsequent immune infiltration. By unpicking this mechanism, it is hoped that new anti-cancer targets will be identified.

 

I’m really excited about this work – there is an urgent need to improve how we treat oesophageal cancer, and this work will improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms driving treatment resistance and disease progression, and hopefully identify new drug targets we can use against this aggressive disease .

- Eileen Parkes 

 You can read more about the Wellcome Trust and their mission here (opens in the new window).

Similar stories

Population-scale study highlights ongoing risk of COVID-19 in some cancer patients despite vaccination

COVID-19 vaccination is effective in most cancer patients, but the level of protection against COVID-19 infection, hospitalisation and death offered by the vaccine is less than in the general population and vaccine effectiveness wanes more quickly.

OUH agrees long COVID research collaboration with Polarean

The collaboration will look at understanding the long-term effects of COVID-19 through cutting-edge MRI analysis.

Lung abnormalities found in long COVID patients with breathlessness

Researchers have identified abnormalities in the lungs of long COVID patients who are experiencing breathlessness that cannot be detected with routine tests.

New blood-based test is the first ever to simultaneously identify if a patient has cancer and if it has spread

A publication by University of Oxford researchers describes a new minimally invasive and inexpensive blood test that can identify cancer in patients with non-specific symptoms. The early success of this technology makes it the first blood-based test that not only detects cancer in this population but can simultaneously identify if a cancer has spread.

MP Anneliese Dodds tours Oxford cancer research

Anneliese Dodds, MP for Oxford East & Chair of the Labour Party, visited the University of Oxford to learn more about the impactful work happening across departments in the field of cancer research.