Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Many congratulations to Dr Mark Hill, who has become a Fellow of the Society for Radiological Protection (FSRP).

Dr Mark Hill was awarded the honour of Fellow of the Society for Radiological Protection (FSRP) in recognition of his significant impact within the field of radiation protection.

Mark has over 30 years of experience in the field of radiation biology and physics. The main focus of his work relates to understanding the mechanisms behind how the spatial and temporal pattern of energy deposition by ionising radiation drives the subsequent biological response and ultimately the associated human health implications.

Alongside his research, Mark has been involved with a number of national and international committees, is Course Director of our MSc in Radiation Biology, lectures on the Annual Radiological Protection Summer School at University of Cambridge, and is a specialist radiobiology examiner on the First FRCR examination board for the Royal College of Radiologists. This year is also due to become a Member of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE), which provides independent advice to all UK government departments and agencies.

Speaking of the award, Mark said “It is an honour to receive recognition from my peers for all the work I have done over the years”.

Similar stories

Lung abnormalities found in long COVID patients with breathlessness

Researchers have identified abnormalities in the lungs of long COVID patients who are experiencing breathlessness that cannot be detected with routine tests.

New blood-based test is the first ever to simultaneously identify if a patient has cancer and if it has spread

A publication by University of Oxford researchers describes a new minimally invasive and inexpensive blood test that can identify cancer in patients with non-specific symptoms. The early success of this technology makes it the first blood-based test that not only detects cancer in this population but can simultaneously identify if a cancer has spread.

Eileen Parkes secures Clinical Research Career Development Fellowship

Eileen is awarded funding for her research into the tumour microenvironment

MP Anneliese Dodds tours Oxford cancer research

Anneliese Dodds, MP for Oxford East & Chair of the Labour Party, visited the University of Oxford to learn more about the impactful work happening across departments in the field of cancer research.

World’s first cancer prevention trial to test diabetes drug in patients with high-risk genetic condition

Oxford researchers will lead a £2m national cancer prevention trial to assess the benefit a diabetes drug has in patients with Li Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), a genetic condition that impacts 1 in 20,000 people worldwide and puts them at a 70-90% lifetime risk of cancer.