Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Dr James Larkin, a postdoctoral researcher from Nicola Sibson’s lab in the CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Biology, has won a silver medal in 2018 STEM for Britain, a Parliamentary poster competition that gives researchers the chance to present their work to policymakers and politicians and discuss their work with local MPs.

STEM for Britain, organised by the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee with support from the Royal Society of Biology, Royal Academy of Engineering, Royal Society of Chemistry and the Institute of Physics, is open to early career researchers engaged in scientific, engineering, technological or medical research.

James, alongside more than 40 bioscientists at the event, presented his research on brain tumour diagnostics, taking one of three medals home from the competition. His research is on developing a technique to diagnose brain tumours as early as possible by profiling the metabolites in urine samples.

Around one in five cancer patients develop secondary tumours, or metastases, which spread to the brain. These are hard to diagnose early using current techniques and late-stage diagnosis limits therapeutic options. James and the team have shown that this novel technique can be used to diagnose and track development of metastases in mice and are now trialling the same methods in patients with brain metastases.

On winning the award, James said, "I had a great time at the STEM for Britain event and met a number of people interested in my research and its applications. To be recognised with an award as well is a fantastic honour and I would like to thank the judges for their confidence in my work.

"In addition, I would like to thank my funders, Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council, for supporting this work, as well as my colleagues and collaborators, without whom none of this project would be possible."
Stephen Metcalfe MP, chair of the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee, said: "This annual competition is an important date in the parliamentary calendar because it gives MPs an opportunity to speak to a wide range of the country's best young researchers.

"These early career engineers, mathematicians and scientists are the architects of our future and STEM for Britain is politicians' best opportunity to meet them and understand their work."

Similar stories

Hidden lung damage from COVID-19 revealed in new study

Research Translational Research

Early findings from a study into longer-term damage amongst patients recovering from COVID-19 suggest that the use of cutting-edge scanning techniques may detect previously unseen lung damage.

Oxfordshire-based SCAN pathway wins BMJ award

Innovation Research

A pathway designed to investigate individuals with non-specific but concerning symptoms of cancer wins the BMJ Awards 2020 Cancer Care Team of the Year.

Tackling the serious side effects of cancer treatment in an ageing population

Publication Research

Prof. Anne Kiltie and her team discuss their important work into the effects of radiosensitisation on ageing cancer patients with the CRUK Science Blog.

New digital classification method using AI developed for colorectal cancer

Artificial Intelligence Research Translational Research

Understanding the molecular subtype of a cancer is becoming an importance part of the diagnostic process as it helps a doctor better understand a patient’s prognosis, determine the best course of action for treatment and helps researchers devise new, more-efficient, precision therapies.

The CNIO creates a collaborative platform to streamline brain metastasis research

Research

Professor Nicola Sibson has been involved in the CNIO platform to compile a repository for brain metastasis cell lines.

Virtual teaching with AimHi

General Outreach Research

One of our scientists, Dr Hannah Bolland, has become a virtual teacher, connecting school students with science.