Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Many congratulations to Robert Watson, a NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow in the laboratory of Benjamin Fairfax in the Department of Oncology. Robert was successful in his application for a CRUK pre-doctoral research bursary.

Pre-doctoral research bursaries are awarded biannually by Cancer Research UK to "provide short-term funding to allow clinicians and other health professionals to get involved in research projects early in their career". This scheme was ideal for Robert Watson, a junior doctor with an interest in academic research. He is currently taking a year out from his clinical training to conduct research in the laboratory of Benjamin Fairfax at the MRC WIMM, and is interested in applying for a PhD at a later date. "This CRUK grant will support my research this year" explains Rob "It will give me a chance to experience research and develop my skills, and hopefully gather preliminary data that will help me apply for a PhD".

The laboratory of Dr Benjamin Fairfax is examining the genetic changes that accompany the treatment of cancer with immunotherapies. During his time in the lab, Robert will be using sequencing techniques to investigate changes to the T cell repertoire during checkpoint inhibitor treatments. "I am very keen to work in the area of immunoncology and to further develop my skills in genetic medicine and computational biology, so this projects fits well with the lab's strategy and my own personal aims", says Robert. The successful bid will provide £25,000 towards the project's research expenses.

Similar stories

Hidden lung damage from COVID-19 revealed in new study

Research Translational Research

Early findings from a study into longer-term damage amongst patients recovering from COVID-19 suggest that the use of cutting-edge scanning techniques may detect previously unseen lung damage.

Oxfordshire-based SCAN pathway wins BMJ award

Innovation Research

A pathway designed to investigate individuals with non-specific but concerning symptoms of cancer wins the BMJ Awards 2020 Cancer Care Team of the Year.

Tackling the serious side effects of cancer treatment in an ageing population

Publication Research

Prof. Anne Kiltie and her team discuss their important work into the effects of radiosensitisation on ageing cancer patients with the CRUK Science Blog.

New digital classification method using AI developed for colorectal cancer

Artificial Intelligence Research Translational Research

Understanding the molecular subtype of a cancer is becoming an importance part of the diagnostic process as it helps a doctor better understand a patient’s prognosis, determine the best course of action for treatment and helps researchers devise new, more-efficient, precision therapies.

The CNIO creates a collaborative platform to streamline brain metastasis research

Research

Professor Nicola Sibson has been involved in the CNIO platform to compile a repository for brain metastasis cell lines.

Oxford University to lead a new national programme of AI research to improve lung cancer screening

Artificial Intelligence Funding

UK Research and Innovation, Cancer Research UK and industry are investing more than £11 million in an Oxford-led artificial intelligence (AI) research programme to improve the diagnosis of lung cancer and other thoracic diseases.