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One of our scientists, Dr Hannah Bolland, has become a virtual teacher, connecting school students with science.

Dr Hannah Bolland is a post-doctoral researcher working with Professor Ester Hammond, and has also taken on the role as a biology teacher with AimHi.

Hannah was selected to give a series of video lessons to students from around the world. The first lesson, ‘What is Cancer’, streamed live on 27 May and is still available on the AimHi YouTube Channel.

In 28 mins, Hannah explored the Hayflick limit, mutations, the growth of cancer and even some pathology slides. The students were constantly engaged contributing comments through the chat feature. Her session ends with why we should love naked mole rats! 

Hannah did a fantastic job, introducing new material, annotating live on the slide, and responding to questions in the interactive  chat feature. The lesson was a dynamic mixture of ideas, pictures, audience input, and quizzes. Hannah’s next session will talk about diagnosis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

AimHi

AimHi was started by Matthew Shribman, former PhD student at Oxford’s Department of Chemistry, and Henry Waite, an Oxford chemistry graduate.

Aware that schools were closing round the world, they set out to put students in contact with exceptional teachers with expert knowledge. School students are provided with the chance to interact with scientists and explore topics from space to dinosaurs, and, in Hannah’s case, cancer.

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