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BACKGROUND: Advanced melanoma is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. Approved therapy is limited in the U.K. and, until recently, no treatment had improved survival over best supportive care. A deeper understanding of current clinical practice will help new agents find a place in future treatment pathways. OBJECTIVES: To document U.K. clinical practice for the treatment of patients with unresectable stage III/IV (advanced) melanoma. METHODS: MELODY (melanoma treatment patterns and outcomes among patients with unresectable stage III/IV disease: a retrospective longitudinal survey) compiled registries of consecutive patients with malignant melanoma (any stage) between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2006 from France, Italy and the U.K. Patients with advanced melanoma and ≥ 2 months of follow-up were eligible for analysis. RESULTS: There were 220 eligible patients identified in the U.K., of whom 117 (53.2%) received systemic therapy outside of clinical trials. Over half of these patients received dacarbazine as first- or second-line therapy. Healthcare-resource utilization was extensive and patients had short survival times: 1- and 2-year survival rates after first-line systemic treatment were 45.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 37.1-53.6] and 24.7% (95% CI 17.7-32.3), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic and palliative treatments used to manage advanced melanoma in the U.K. are associated with considerable healthcare resource utilization and poor short-term survival.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/bjd.12503

Type

Journal article

Journal

Br J Dermatol

Publication Date

01/2014

Volume

170

Pages

87 - 95

Keywords

Antineoplastic Agents, Female, Health Resources, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Melanoma, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Metastasis, Retrospective Studies, Skin Neoplasms, Treatment Outcome, United Kingdom